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Tourist Trophy The Real Riding Simulator


Like the GT games, Tourist Trophy lets players race an impressive array of real-life rides, more than 80 in all. Manufacturers including Kawasaki, Triumph, Honda and Ducati (Harley didn't want in, sadly) are represented, and the bikes themselves run the gamut from classic cafe racers to cutting-edge sport bikes. Unlike inGT, however, players won't be able to modify these rides much; in a rare attempt to keep things simple and appeal to an audience not obsessed with gear ratios, the designers at Polyphony Digital replaced the tinkering options with customizable riders. There's a broad array of licensed helmets, boots and other racing gear to choose from, and players will be also able to pick from three different riding styles that affect turning and control, but new engine parts and shocks are right out.




Tourist Trophy The Real Riding Simulator



Tourist Trophy's default setting is "Normal. Using the Normal setting, the player can perform maneuvers such as the "wheelie" and the "stoppie" on powerful bikes. These possibilities are disabled with the "Professional" setting. Enabling the Professional feature will enhance the simulation aspect as well as the difficulty level, over the arcade-oriented Normal. Professional riding is supposed to allow a more realistic experience with autonomous upper body control (as the "Tuck" manual function is enabled), and a separated front/rear brake control is added over the rear+front brake default system.


Tourist Trophy: The Real Riding Simulator is essentially Gran Turismo on two wheels. You have about 120 licensed bikes and 30 tracks in a realistic motorcycle-racing simulation.Of course, motorcycles don't handle like cars. This is reflected in-game by giving you control over your rider's side-to-side leaning to affect cornering. Of course, all the standard simulation elements of braking, positioning, throttle control and condition of your ride are important as well.The game is divided into two main modes. Arcade mode allows you to do timed runs, quick races against AI opponents or split-screen racing.The main mode, Tourist Trophy, first puts you through a series of licensing tests. Each license opens up a group of challenges or races. Each challenge or race corresponds to a motorcycle, which you can earn by winning it. There is no cash in this game. Some events also unlock further events, of course.Bikes are customizable. You can set the tire compound, brakes, shocks, gear ratio and exhaust. Riders have even more options. Not only can they wear a variety of licensed clothing, their riding style is customizable, allowing you to adjust things like the position they take in leans, which affects handling.


Yet, when given a choice between a car and a motorcycle in a video game, I almost always go for the motorcycle. There is something really appealing about weaving in and out of traffic, and being able to feel like the vehicle is merely an extension of your physical self. Driving a car is so pedestrian; I have driven a dozen cars in my lifetime, and they are all pretty much the same. But as stated earlier, I have no intention of actually riding a motorcycle, due to the likelihood of causing physical and financial harm. Therefore, I do all of my bike racing with my controller.


Unfortunately, only a couple of games have made riding motorcycles fun. Most notable are the Grand Theft Auto games, which thrust you into a huge, living city in which you can go anywhere and do anything. When Grand Theft Auto: Vice City first came out, I remember spending hours just riding around and pulling random stunts. It may not be realistic, but it sure is a blast. On the other side of the spectrum, the Moto GP series presents motorbike racing in a realistic fashion, though for non-aficionados, it can be an exercise in futility. Maintaining balance while taking sharp turns at high speeds typically ends with my character rolling around in the grass, much like my real-life mini-bike incident. 041b061a72


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